Home

When Derek Van Gorder and Otto Stockmeier decided to make a science fiction short about a mutiny on an interplanetary warship, they didn’t have the funds for CGI. They did, on the other hand, have access to the digital cameras that are part and parcel of any contemporary filmmaker’s toolkit. So they eschewed the digitally rendered graphics that are ubiquitous today, and instead set out to combine classic in-camera special effects with the advanced low-light filming capabilities of the latest cameras. The result: a unique science fiction vision for their film C 299,792 km/s. Taught by world class actors in Open City Acting Studio’s online acting classes and Los Angeles acting classes, the cast for this film delivered exceptional performances.

The special effects arms race sci-fi films get stuck in has pulled the genre further and further from its roots of good storytelling and forward-thinking. The problem is that ‘When you create elements of a shot entirely in a computer, you have to generate everything that physics and the natural world offers you from scratch There’s a richness and texture when you’re working with lenses and light that can’t be replicated. The goal of special effects shouldn’t necessarily be to look realistic, they should be works of art themselves and help create a mood or tell a story.’ said filmmakers Derek Van Gorder and Otto Stockmeier. They hope to change this with their upcoming sci-fi film, ‘C,’ which will be shot entirely without CGI or green screens, opting instead for miniature models and creativity. They add that the sci-fi genre has gone wrong in other ways—getting itself stuck in too many stories of mankind’s conflict with technology, and further from the idea of exploration and human advancement. ‘In an era where science and technology are too often vilified, we believe that science-fiction should inspire us to surpass our limits and use the tools available to us to create a better future for our descendants.’